Tower of goats

This week’s Riddler classic is a counting problem. Can the goats fit in the tower?

A tower has 10 floors, each of which can accommodate a single goat. Ten goats approach the tower, and each goat has its own (random) preference of floor. Multiple goats can prefer the same floor. One by one, each goat walks up the tower to its preferred room. If the floor is empty, the goat will make itself at home. But if the floor is already occupied by another goat, then it will keep going up until it finds the next empty floor, which it will occupy. But if it does not find any empty floors, the goat will be stuck on the roof of the tower. What is the probability that all 10 goats will have their own floor, meaning no goat is left stranded on the roof of the tower?

My solution:
[Show Solution]

Catch the grasshopper

This week’s Riddler classic is a probability problem about a grasshopper!

You are trying to catch a grasshopper on a balance beam that is 1 meter long. Every time you try to catch it, it jumps to a random point along the interval between 20 centimeters left of its current position and 20 centimeters right of its current position. If the grasshopper is within 20 centimeters of one of the edges, it will not jump off the edge. For example, if it is 10 centimeters from the left edge of the beam, then it will randomly jump to anywhere within 30 centimeters of that edge with equal probability (meaning it will be twice as likely to jump right as it is to jump left). After many, many failed attempts to catch the grasshopper, where is it most likely to be on the beam? Where is it least likely? And what is the ratio between these respective probabilities?

My solution:
[Show Solution]

Desert escape

This week’s Riddler classic is about geometry and probability, and desert escape! Here is the (paraphrased) problem:

There are $n$ travelers who are trapped on a thin and narrow oasis. They each independently pick a random location in the oasis from which to start and a random direction in which to travel. What is the probability that none of their paths will intersect, in terms of $n$?

My solution:
[Show Solution]

Tetrahedral dice game

This week’s Riddler Classic is a game of four-sided dice:

You have four fair tetrahedral dice whose four sides are numbered 1 through 4.

You play a game in which you roll them all and divide them into two groups: those whose values are unique, and those which are duplicates. For example, if you roll a 1, 2, 2 and 4, then the 1 and 4 will go into the “unique” group, while the 2s will go into the “duplicate” group.

Next, you reroll all the dice in the duplicate pool and sort all the dice again. Continuing the previous example, that would mean you reroll the 2s. If the result happens to be 1 and 3, then the “unique” group will now consist of 3 and 4, while the “duplicate” group will have two 1s.

You continue rerolling the duplicate pool and sorting all the dice until all the dice are members of the same group. If all four dice are in the “unique” group, you win. If all four are in the “duplicate” group, you lose.

What is your probability of winning the game?

My solution:
[Show Solution]

Frustrating elevator

This weeks Riddler Express is a problem about a frustrating elevator! Here it goes:

You are on the 10th floor of a tower and want to exit on the first floor. You get into the elevator and hit 1. However, this elevator is malfunctioning in a specific way. When you hit 1, it correctly registers the request to descend, but it randomly selects some floor below your current floor (including the first floor). The car then stops at that floor. If it’s not the first floor, you again hit 1 and the process repeats.

Assuming you are the only passenger on the elevator, how many floors on average will it stop at (including your final stop, the first floor) until you exit?

My solution:
[Show Solution]

The luckiest coin

This week’s Riddler Classic is about finding the “luckiest” coin!

I have in my possession 1 million fair coins. I first flip all 1 million coins simultaneously, discarding any coins that come up tails. I flip all the coins that come up heads a second time, and I again discard any of these coins that come up tails. I repeat this process, over and over again. If at any point I am left with one coin, I declare that to be the “luckiest” coin.

But getting to one coin is no sure thing. For example, I might find myself with two coins, flip both of them and have both come up tails. Then I would have zero coins, never having had exactly one coin.

What is the probability that I will at some point have exactly one “luckiest” coin?

Here is my solution:
[Show Solution]

Squid game

This week’s Riddler Classic is Squid Game-themed!

There are 16 competitors who must cross a bridge made up of 18 pairs of separated glass squares. Here is what the bridge looks like from above:

To cross the bridge, each competitor jumps from one pair of squares to the next. However, they must choose one of the two squares in a pair to land on. Within each pair, one square is made of tempered glass, while the other is made of normal glass. If you jump onto tempered glass, all is well, and you can continue on to the next pair of squares. But if you jump onto normal glass, it will break, and you will be eliminated from the competition.

The competitors have no knowledge of which square within each pair is made of tempered glass. The only way to figure it out is to take a leap of faith and jump onto a square. Once a pair is revealed — either when someone lands on a tempered square or a normal square — all remaining competitors take notice and will choose the tempered glass when they arrive at that pair.

On average, how many of the 16 competitors will make it across the bridge?

Here is my solution.
[Show Solution]

And here is a much better solution!
[Show Solution]

Can you eat all the chocolates?

This week’s Riddler Classic is a neat puzzle about eating chocolates.

I have 10 chocolates in a bag: Two are milk chocolate, while the other eight are dark chocolate. One at a time, I randomly pull chocolates from the bag and eat them — that is, until I pick a chocolate of the other kind. When I get to the other type of chocolate, I put it back in the bag and start drawing again with the remaining chocolates. I keep going until I have eaten all 10 chocolates.

For example, if I first pull out a dark chocolate, I will eat it. (I’ll always eat the first chocolate I pull out.) If I pull out a second dark chocolate, I will eat that as well. If the third one is milk chocolate, I will not eat it (yet), and instead place it back in the bag. Then I will start again, eating the first chocolate I pull out.

What are the chances that the last chocolate I eat is milk chocolate?

Here is my original solution:
[Show Solution]

And here is a far more elegant solution, courtesy of @rahmdphd on Twitter.
[Show Solution]

Flawless war

his week’s Riddler Classic has to do with the card game “War”. Here is the problem, paraphrased:

War is a two-player game in which a standard deck of cards is first shuffled and then divided into two piles with 26 cards each; one pile for each player. In every turn of the game, both players flip over and reveal the top card of their deck. The player whose card has a higher rank wins the turn and places both cards on the bottom of their pile. Assuming a deck is randomly shuffled before every game, how many games of War would you expect to play until you had a game that lasted just 26 turns (with no ties; a flawless victory)?

Here is my solution:
[Show Solution]

Cutting a ruler into pieces

This week’s Riddler Classic is a paradoxical question about cutting a ruler into smaller pieces.

Recently, there was an issue with the production of foot-long rulers. It seems that each ruler was accidentally sliced at three random points along the ruler, resulting in four pieces. Looking on the bright side, that means there are now four times as many rulers — they just happen to have different lengths. On average, how long are the pieces that contain the 6-inch mark?

With four cuts, each piece will be on average 3 inches long, but that can’t be the answer, can it?

Here is my solution:
[Show Solution]